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Hardware FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

[ Miscellaneous Questions | Commodore 64 Questions ]

See also: Software Downloads (Drivers etc.)

Miscellaneous Questions
  1. SCSI Questions
  2. An elephant stomped onto my computer, what should I do now?
Commodore 64 Questions
  1. Does MMC64 work in combination with Retro Replay, RR-Net and MP3@64 (or Silversurfer)?
  2. Does MMC Replay work in combination with RR-Net and MP3@64 (or Silversurfer)?
  3. Where can I find the MMC Replay user manual?
  4. What type of power supply should I use with the Chameleon cartridge?

Miscellaneous Questions


What does a correct SCSI daisy chain look like?

All of the devices on the SCSI bus must be connected in one daisy chain, intersections are not allowed. It doesn't matter where the devices are attached, even the host adapter (often referred to as "controller") may sit in-between. In fact the host adapter must be in-between when internal and external devices are attached.

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Which unit number(s) should I choose for my SCSI device(s)?
SCSI devices can have unit numbers from 0 to 7 (UW-SCSI: 0 to 15), which can usually be set by ID jumpers (other devices like scanners sometimes have a dial or similar, their setting should be fairly obvious). Those jumpers normally have labels like ADDR, ID BIT 0/1/2 (/3 when UW-SCSI), 1/2/4 or similar. The jumpers have binary values, i.e. the first (lowest significant) jumper is 1, the second 2, the third 4 (and when using UW-SCSI, there's a fourth jumper with the value 8). The unit number is a sum of those values as the table shows.

X denotes a closed jumper. Example: To get unit number 6, you'd have to set the jumpers 2 and 1 (2^2 + 2^1 = 4 + 2 = 6).

You should avoid to set SCSI devices to unit 7, this number is usually already occupied by the host adapter ("controller"). Please make sure that every device in the daisy chain has its own unique unit number.
  
2 1 0 Unit
      0
    x 1
  x   2
  x x 3
x     4
x   x 5
x x   6

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How to terminate the SCSI bus correctly?

The SCSI standard dictates that the physical ends of the daisy chain must be terminated, while any device in-between must not be terminated. Please make sure that the devices at the ends of your daisy chain (and only those two!) have the termination set (usually selectable by a jumper labelled TERM, TE or SE), or that there is a terminator pack at the respective end where the last device is not terminated. It is also important to make sure that any device in-between is not terminated, so please check their jumpers too.

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An elephant stomped onto my computer, what should I do now?

Please remove any remaining elephant parts from the computer (or remove any remaining computer parts from the elephant, the choice is yours). Check the elephant and the computer to see if they still work, chances are the elephant still does. If not, please go and see a veterany (or the local knacker if it's too late for repair). You should really consider keeping your elephants and computers separately, especially since elephant-related computer damages are seldomly covered by warranty.


Commodore 64 Questions


Does MMC64 work in combination with Retro Replay, RR-Net and MP3@64 (or Silversurfer)?

Yes, they all work together nicely. The clockport of MMC64 is software-compatible with the Retro Replay. That means RR-Net works fine with Contiki. If a Retro Replay is plugged in the pass-through of MMC64, then the MMC64's clockport moves to a different address, so RR-Net must be placed on the Retro Replay's clockport to work properly. The MMC64 clockport can then be used for a Silversurfer or an MP3@64, in other words: You have two fully working clockports in your CBM system.

Please mind the following drawbacks: Commodore power supplies are notoriously under-sized. You might need a stronger power supply. Also, the C128 cannot be considered C64-compatible in regard to the expansion port. Especially the MMC64 with its state-of-the-art 3.3V logic has serious problems with most C128 models, so there's no guarantee MMC64+RR-Net work properly on a C128. The usual recommendation is: Get a real C64, and all problems will be gone.

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Does MMC Replay work in combination with RR-Net and MP3@64 (or Silversurfer)?

The first version of the RR-Net module doesn't fit the MMC Replay mechanically, but this version is no longer available anyway. The second version of RR-Net was designed with the MMC Replay in mind, both fit into a standard cartridge shell together.

MP3@64 and Silversurfer are a different matter, those two can currently not be used with the MMC Replay (as of February 2008).

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Where can I find the MMC Replay user manual?

Right here (PDF file, February 7, 2008).

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What type of power supply should I use with the Chameleon cartridge?

The power supply for the stand-alone mode should have 5V/1000mA, anything less can lead to severe problems when other hardware is attached (especially older PS/2 keyboards can be troublesome in this regard). Please do not use a weaker power supply with your Chameleon cartridge!

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